The chairman of the People’s Party of Canada, Maxime Bernier, loses his seat – again

Maxime Bernier, the leader of the People’s Party of Canada, failed to win the seat in his riding from Beauce, Que. for the second straight election, despite growing support for his party in recent weeks.

Bernier lost his ride on Monday to Conservative Party candidate Richard Lehoux, who defeated the PPC leader in the last federal election in 2019. Bernier previously held the seat as a member of the Conservative Party of Canada for 13 years until he stepped down in 2018 to start the PPC.

Support for the PPC has risen sharply in the past few weeks, but that hasn’t translated into seats in the government. As of 10:53 p.m. ET, the PPC improved its performance in 2019 with 4.9 percent of the popular vote but no seats in government.

Unfortunately, we will not be able to continue this struggle in Parliament, but we will continue this struggle to unite Canadians under the umbrella of freedom.Maxime Bernier to the supporters

“When the next elections come we will be even better prepared and this time we will win seats in parliament.

Despite not winning seats, the growth in popular support is an improvement for a party that was on the verge of extinction after failing to win a seat in the 2019 election and receiving 1.6 percent of the vote.

Bernier’s party ran a campaign mainly focused on resisting COVID-19 lockdowns and vaccine mandates. The PPC party is also against policies related to multiculturalism and promises to significantly reduce the number of immigrants and refugees admitted to Canada. The party also promised to withdraw government intervention related to climate change, saying “Climate change alarmism is based on flawed models”.

An Ipsos poll in the run-up to election night showed that the party is expected to receive 4 percent of the votes cast. Support for the PPC reached 7 percent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and 6 percent in Alberta, according to Ipsos. A Leger poll found that voting intent for the PPC party reached 6 percent nationwide, and up to 10 percent in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

About Gloria Skelton

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