10 Best Personal Finance Books of 2021

Looking for a great money book for your summer reading? Here is our short list of the best personal finance books for 2021.

Bankrate’s 10 Best Personal Finance Books for 2021

  • “The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Rich,” by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko
  • “How to Make Your Money Last: The Essential Guide to Retirement,” by Jane Bryant Quinn
  • “A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Proven Strategy for Successful Investing,” by Burton G. Malkiel
  • “Why Smart People Do Stupid Things with Money: Overcoming Financial Dysfunction,” by Bert Whitehead
  • All Your Worth: The Ultimate Lifetime Money Plan by Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Warren Tyagi
  • “The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing,” by Benjamin Graham
  • Bunny Money (Max & Ruby) directed by Rosemary Wells
  • “Spend Well, Live Rich: How to Get What You Want with the Money,” by Michelle Singletary
  • “Broke Millennial: Stop Scratching By and Get Your Financial Life Together,” by Erin Lowry
  • “Maintain a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties,” by Beth Kobliner

“The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Rich,” by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko

Who should read this book:

Anyone who wants to build solid financial behavior.

Why the book made our list:

Being rich doesn’t mean being flashy. In fact it’s the opposite. This book shows that many wealthy people shy away from buying the most expensive cars and taking the most lavish vacations, choosing instead to be more disciplined with their money. It turns out that being a millionaire is more about being frugal.

“How to Make Your Money Last: The Essential Guide to Retirement” by Jane Bryant Quinn

Who should read this book:

Those looking to build wealth through solid investment advice.

Why the book made our list:

If you have questions about preserving your investments into retirement, this book has the answers. With thoughtful details on ways to cut income Social Security, investments and more, Quinn shows how to create a recurring paycheck that’s easy to get by with retirement.

“A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Proven Strategy for Successful Investing,” by Burton G. Malkiel

Who should read this book:

Anyone (especially business students) who wants to understand how the stock market works.

Why the book made our list:

If you are new to investing, this book sets out an excellent blueprint for success. Malkiel details a variety of investment strategies, including “smart beta” investing (which combines the benefits of passive investing and the benefits of active investing strategies) and finding opportunities in emerging markets. The reader gets a complete overview of the complex world of investing.

“Why Smart People Do Stupid Things with Money: Overcoming Financial Dysfunction,” by Bert Whitehead

Who should read this book:

Readers who wish to align their financial behavior towards a more sustainable future.

Why the book made our list:

Maybe you missed it Pay off your credit card debt in full each month, or perhaps you have not contributed to any type of retirement saving account. No matter how smart you think you are, you’ve probably made a misstep with your money. This book suggests that the error in your ways can be attributed less to your wallet and more to your wits.

All Your Worth: The Ultimate Lifetime Money Plan by Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Warren Tyagi

Who should read this book:

Those looking for practical advice when developing a budget.

Why the book made our list:

Warren and Tyagi emphasize the importance of balance in managing your money by sharing a step-by-step guide that can help you devote more of your finances to saving. pay off debts and the development of a promising financial future.

“The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing” by Benjamin Graham

Who should read this book:

Readers who want to understand the risks and benefits of investing.

Why the book made our list:

This book is the gold standard of investing. You will learn the importance of value investing, which enables investors to develop long-term strategies. And with updated insights from financial reporter Jason Zweig, readers will gain an understanding of long-term values ​​and how to integrate them into the current financial landscape.

Bunny Money (Max & Ruby) directed by Rosemary Wells

Who should read this book:

Children who want to learn the basics of personal finance.

Why the book made our list:

The story in this children’s book is about the rabbits Max and Ruby who are trying to buy their grandma a present for her birthday. As they set out, they encounter a series of adventures that drain their cash reserves. The children discover how their decisions affect their money.

‘Spend Well, Live Rich: How to Get What You Want with Money’ by Michelle Singletary

Who should read this book:

Readers who want practical advice on managing their money.

Why the book made our list:

Singletary records the “7 Money Mantras for a Richer Life” that she learned from her grandmother. These mantras may be simple in nature, but they provide a solid foundation for anyone hoping to build solid financial behavior. The book distinguishes between wants and needs and why you should make small things sweat.

“Broke Millennial: Stop Scratching By and Get Your Financial Life Together,” by Erin Lowry

Who should read this book:

Any millennial who wants to learn the basics of money management and avoid common financial mistakes.

Why the book made our list:

Lowry creates a plan to live paycheck to paycheck and achieve your financial goals. She delves into the thought process behind financial decisions like “Treat your money like a Tinder date or marriage?” By providing actionable insight and relatable stories, this book gives people in their 20s and 30s the fundamentals they need to make make better money decisions.

“Maintain a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties,” by Beth Kobliner

Who should read this book:

People in their 20s and 30s who are looking for advice on managing their finances.

Why this book made our list:

This book covers all aspects of personal finance how to file taxes and investing to strategies for Improving your credit scores. Kobliner creates a guide that encompasses every aspect of your financial life, with practical suggestions you can apply to build a financial future that will help you achieve your goals.

About Gloria Skelton

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